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augmented reality Conference

Augmented reality development: ARKit or ARCore?

Augmented reality is both promising and cutting edge, even interaction paradigms may need to change:

There are two new major augmented reality frameworks, one for Apple iOS (see Peter Jackson’s Wingnut Studio Unreal/Apple ARKit example) and ARCore for Google phones..which should you consider, ARKit or ARCore? (https://developers.google.com/ar/discover/ ) see https://medium.com/super-ventures-blog/how-is-arcore-better-than-arkit-5223e6b3e79d …

OR side-by-side https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNXBvDKRg1M

A good feature list comparison: https://www.newgenapps.com/blog/arkit-vs-arcore-the-key-differences

The opportunities for archaeology are huge: http://www.dead-mens-eyes.org/arkit-and-archaeology-hougoumont-farm-waterloo/

I said two options, but there are many, plus there is the more expensive HoloLens option (self contained totally portable mixed reality system with figure gesture recognition) and the new meta HMD, with wider field of view (90 degrees and about a third less in price).

The HoloLens at Curtin1505.jpg

 

 

By EMC

Professor Erik Champion is an Honorary Research Professor at ANU, Honorary Research Fellow at UWA and Emeritus Professor, Curtin University. He is currently a chief investigator for 1 ARDC Grant, and 3 (soon to be 4) Australian Research Council grants:
2020-2023 ARC Linkage Photogrammetric Reconstruction for Underwater Virtual Heritage Experiences: https://dataportal.arc.gov.au/NCGP/Web/Grant/Grant/LP180100284
2020-2021 ARC LIEF Time-layered cultural map of Australia: https://dataportal.arc.gov.au/NCGP/Web/Grant/Grant/LE190100019
2020-2021 The Digitisation Centre of Western Australia (Phase 1): https://dataportal.arc.gov.au/NCGP/Web/Grant/Grant/LE200100123

Publications
His recent books are Organic Design in Twentieth-Century Nordic Architecture (Routledge, 2019), Critical Gaming: Interactive History and Virtual Heritage for Routledge’s Digital Research in the Arts and Humanities Series (2016), and Playing with the Past (Springer, 2011). He was editor of The Phenomenology of Real and Virtual Places (Routledge, 2018), and Game Mods: Design, Theory and Criticism (ETC Press, 2012) and he was co-editor of Cultural Heritage Infrastructures in Digital Humanities (Routledge, 2017). He reviews book proposals for MIT, Oxford University Press, Routledge, and a variety of leading academic journals. His next book, Rethinking Virtual Places, will be published by Indiana University Press (Spatial Humanities series).

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