Architecture, virtual heritage

Uploaded some older papers: Virtual Places, and The Limits of Realism

Virtual Places
Article. From: Encyclopedia of virtual communities and technologies, 2006, Idea Group Reference

Communities identify and are identified by not just the clothes they wear or by the language they speak, or even by the way they greet each other. Communities are often identified by where their activities take place, how they use spaces to construct meanings, and the traces left by their social interactions. These “trigger” regions are thus not just points in space; they are also landmarks, havens, homes, ruins, or hells. Communities, then, are identified and identify with or against, not just space but place. For places do not just organize space; they orient,
identity, and animate the bodies, minds, and feelings of both inhabitants and visitors.

The Limits of Realism in Architectural Visualisation
Conference paper.
FOR: LIMITS XXIst annual conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand Melbourne, Australia (SAHANZ) 26–29 September, 2004 website: http://sahanz04.tce.rmit.edu.au/
ABSTRACT
In March 2004 the eminent scholar Professor Marco Frascari presented an informal seminar at the University of Melbourne in which he argued computer reconstructions of architecture were far too exact and thus too limited in conveying the mood and atmosphere of architecture. With all due respect to Professor Frascari, this paper will argue the converse: that recent developments in interactive technology offer new and exciting ways of conveying ‘lived’ and experientially deepened notions of architectural placemaking. Using current research findings in virtual presence studies, archaeological theory and site reports, as well as usability evaluations; this paper will examine the above issues in relation to a recently created and evaluated virtual reconstruction of a Mesoamerican cityLIMITS XXIst annual conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand Melbourne, Australia (SAHANZ) 26–29 September, 2004

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